[ read online Textbooks ] Producing Power: The Pre-Chernobyl History of the Soviet Nuclear Industry (Inside Technology) (English Edition) Author Sonja D Schmid – Andy-palmer.co.uk


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  • Producing Power: The Pre-Chernobyl History of the Soviet Nuclear Industry (Inside Technology) (English Edition)
  • Sonja D Schmid
  • Ingl├ęs
  • 18 April 2018

3 thoughts on “ Producing Power: The Pre-Chernobyl History of the Soviet Nuclear Industry (Inside Technology) (English Edition)

  1. says:

    Honestly I haven t read it yet, but in browsing through it, looks very interesting This is minor, I love it when books are printed on smooth heavy paper which like this one.


  2. says:

    This is the best account of multiple perspectives on what happened in Chernobyl This book also offers a riveting illustration of approaches to science, technology, and the engineering profession in the Soviet nuclear industry.


  3. says:

    A very interest approach to the Chernobyl disaster and the Soviet nuclear industry generally I particularly liked it as a case study of the planning process in the later Soviet era.I would like to have seen the author flesh out some of the ideas presented, such as the socio technological aspects I also thought the chapter on the disaster itself needed just a bit detail I still didn t understand some of the technical aspects by the end so ended up having to look it up elsewhere.


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                        Producing Power: The Pre-Chernobyl History of the Soviet Nuclear Industry (Inside Technology) (English Edition)
                    
                
            In the annals of nuclear meltdown, the April 1986 explosion at Chernobyl in Soviet Ukraine remains the most In the annals of nuclear meltdown, the April 1986 explosion at Chernobyl in Soviet Ukraine remains the most devastating, contaminating thousands of square kilometres of land This trenchant study by science historian Sonja Schmid digs deep into the catastrophe s tangled prehistory to make nuanced sense of it She unravels key scientific, social and political factors, from the plant s lack of redundant safety features to rivalries in the Soviet nuclear industry and inefficiencies in the country s economy NatureAn examination of how the technical choices, social hierarchies, economic structures, and political dynamics shaped the Soviet nuclear industry leading up to Chernobyl.The Chernobyl disaster has been variously ascribed to human error, reactor design flaws, and industry mismanagement Six former Chernobyl employees were convicted of criminal negligence they defended themselves by pointing to reactor design issues Other observers blamed the Soviet style of ideologically driven economic and industrial management In Producing Power, Sonja Schmid draws on interviews with veterans of the Soviet nuclear industry and extensive research in Russian archives as she examines these alternate accounts Rather than pursue one definitive explanation, she investigates how each of these narratives makes sense in its own way and demonstrates that each implies adherence to a particular set of ideasabout high risk technologies, human machine interactions, organizational methods for ensuring safety and productivity, and even about the legitimacy of the Soviet state She also shows how these attitudes shaped, and were shaped by, the Soviet nuclear industry from its very beginnings.Schmid explains that Soviet experts established nuclear power as a driving force of social, not just technical, progress She examines the Soviet nuclear industry s dual origins in weapons and electrification programs, and she traces the emergence of nuclear power experts as a professional community Schmid also fundamentally reassesses the design choices for nuclear power reactors in the shadow of the Cold War s arms race Schmid s account helps us understand how and why a complex sociotechnical system broke down Chernobyl, while unique and specific to the Soviet experience, can also provide valuable lessons for contemporary nuclear projects.